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How To Reload Capital Cartridge Brass For Competitions

Who is Andrew Metze?

Andrew Metze grew up on a S.C. farm with family members that were prolific target shooters and hunters. In order to support the family’s habit, his father made fresh rounds from recycled brass cartridges using a Dillon RL550B press. As a youngster, Andrew’s father taught him to load his own ammunition and by the age of 10, “Dad turned me loose to load my own ammunition, “ Andrew said, “I was a responsible kid, I worked on the family farm and drove tractors, and worked pretty hard.”

Today, at the age of 24, Andrew is a competitive shooter who burns through more ammunition in a few 3-Gun matches than his entire family might have shot in a year when he was a boy. Because he learned how to reload as a child and because of the worth ethic learned from farming, Andrew said he’s better off than some competitors who still don’t reload. The work ethic has paid off as well. In his first year of shooting, Andrew has shown seasoned competitors that he is a force to be reckoned with. He has landed several top finishes at the Greenville Gun Club 3-Gun and Upstate 3-Gun Matches, as well as a first place finish in PCC optics in The Fort Mill Munitions PCC Match held in Clinton, S.C. in February.

“I joined 3-Gun Nation as soon as I shot my first 3-gun match,” Andrew said. “I shot the Sandhills Shooting Sports 3-Gun in Lughoff, S.C. in July of 2016 and I knew 3-gunning was for me. He and his friend Kevin Akim, who took Andrew to his first-ever pistol shooting competition when Andrew was 22, are seen together sharing equipment at various matches in the Carolinas. Both men usually finish in top 20 of any talented field “I would not be able to afford to shoot 3-Gun if I did not reload,” He said. “I can load 50 rounds of 9mm ammunition for about $9.00 a box,” and Andrew says that is a huge savings when most match grade ammunition purchased retail can run up to 34 cents a round. In addition to saving money, Andrew can load his ammunition to shoot the way he wants it. If he wants softer recoil, or faster flying rounds, he has a recipe for that.



He picks up range brass most of the time, but has learned first-hand that buying brass from a company like Capital Cartridge that has been sorted, cleaned, and processed saves time. “You can start loading right out of the container it is shipped in. And having processed brass on hand means you can save steps and save as much as six square feet of work space.” Time is important for so many competitors and hunters who desire to shoot affordable, custom-made ammunition. Squeezing it in between family obligations and full-time jobs can be hard if one relies on gathering, sorting and cleaning his own brass, Andrew says.Andrew is not sure however how he would have gotten into reloading today if his father had not coached him and shown him the steps. “It is a tough thing to learn without someone showing you. But there are classes,” He said. “You just have to be sure to pick one that is really geared for the beginner.”

Christi M. Conner Tate